• José Joordens from Leiden University holds the fossil shell Pseudodon with a small hole that Homo erectus pierced with a sharp object to open. Photo credit: The IndependentJosé Joordens from Leiden University holds the fossil shell Pseudodon with a small hole that Homo erectus pierced with a sharp object to open. Photo credit: The Independent

ANU discovery could re-write our understanding of human origins

Dr Stephen Munro, from the Australian National University, has made a discovery that could demonstrate that art began 300,000 years earlier than we previously thought. He discovered a zig-zag drawn on a shell that was part of a collection of fossils that were collected over 100 years ago. The pattern was drawn by a Homo erectus as long as 540,000 years ago, which means that the engraving is at least 300,000 years older than other markings thought to be the oldest made by humans.

Dr Munro says: “This is the first time we have found evidence for Homo erectus behaving in this way... it rewrites human history.”
 
Read more about this amazing discovery here on the Independent website.  If you are interested in studying at the Australian National University you can find out more here, or contact Study Options for a prospectus.

Find out more about: