• From left: Associate Professor Rodney Stewart, Mr Chris Bennett and Professor Jun Wei Lu, from Griffith's School of Engineering. Photo credit: Griffith UniversityFrom left: Associate Professor Rodney Stewart, Mr Chris Bennett and Professor Jun Wei Lu, from Griffith's School of Engineering. Photo credit: Griffith University

Griffith University researchers install new energy distribution system for Queensland residents

A team of researchers from Griffith University have developed and applied an intelligent scheduling system for the efficient distribution of energy resources to 128 residential customers in South-East Queensland.

Researcher Mr Chris Bennett, working under the supervision of Associate Professor Rodney Stewart and Professor Jun Wei Lu, developed a three-phase battery storage system that will help to provide cheaper, better quality power within low voltage electricity networks.

Mr Bennett explained: “The low voltage network is a typical suburb of a few hundred homes where there is a single area transformer. Recently there has been a substantial increase in the number of homes with installed residential solar PV in these settings. 

“Daily peak demand in residential networks typically occurs in the evenings in summer and both late morning and evening in winter. But because solar PV generation is dependent on incoming solar radiation, peak generation occurs during the middle of the day, typically when demand in the residential distribution network is low.

“This means there is an incongruity between when energy is generated and when it is required, which can lead to power supply and quality issues.”

The intelligent battery storage system that the team has developed can be used to deliver the energy more efficiently to the homes that demand it, when it is needed.  Associate Professor Stewart explains: “The two main advantages of intelligent BES in the LV network are that we can mitigate power quality issues attributed to fluctuations in generation from renewable energy sources such as PV, and we can store surplus energy gathered during the middle of the day and distribute it when it is needed in the evening peak period.”

The development has the potential to help make energy distribution more efficient throughout the grid, reducing unbalanced energy phases and improving power quality.

You can find out more about this development on the Griffith University website here, or contact Study Options for more information about studying at the University.

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