• The new Law library in the Forgan Smith Building at UQ. Photo credit: The University of QueenslandThe new Law library in the Forgan Smith Building at UQ. Photo credit: The University of Queensland

Renovation brings state-of-the-art law facilities to the University of Queensland

The University of Queensland have recently reopened the Forgan Smith building, following AU$35 million of renovation work.  The Forgan Smith building is an iconic part of UQ’s St Lucia campus, designed in the 1930’s to be the visual centrepiece to the campus.

Construction of the Forgan Smith building began in 1938, although World War II interrupted construction progress and it was eventually completed in 1949.

The west wing renovation that has just been completed provides the TC Beirne School of Law with state-of-the-art facilities to support the school’s strengthened focus on collaborative, interactive and innovative learning. UQ Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj said the cost of the renovation was being met by a combination of UQ capital works funding and philanthropic donations. Last month the building was officially opened by the Honourable Susan Kiefel AC, Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia, and former student of the University of Queensland.

Dean of Law and Head of School Professor Sarah Derrington said: "It is a delight to move back into the Forgan Smith building and be able to offer interactive research spaces, break-out rooms, independent study areas and innovative learning, research and academic facilities. Our Bachelor of Laws (Hons) students will have the opportunity to serve the wider community and develop as exceptional legal thinkers with the discipline, ingenuity and connections to create change and enrich the world."

You can find out more about the University of Queensland on their profile page here.  If you’d like to know more about studying law in Australia and New Zealand, there is more information available on this page about transferring law qualifications.

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